Elizabeth Angeli

Networks of communication in emergency medical services

Elizabeth Angeli

  • School: Purdue University (0183)
  • Degree: Ph.D.
  • Date: 2012 pp: 241
  • Advisor: Johnson-Sheehan, Richard D.
  • ┬áSource: DAI-A 74/03(E)
  • Subjects: Language, literature and linguistics; Communication and the arts; Health and environmental sciences; Assemblage theory; Electronic medical records; Emergency medical services; Legitimate peripheral participation; Medical rhetoric; Technical and professional writing; Technical Communication; Rhetoric; Health care management;
  • ProQuest Document Number: 1235141335
  • ISBN: 9781267757715
  • UMI Number: AAT 3544643

Abstract:

This dissertation provides one of the first lines of inquiry into emergency medical services (EMS) communication in the professional and technical writing and medical rhetoric fields. This research examines how EMS communication functions through the theoretical frameworks of network, actor-network, activity, genre, rhizome, and assemblage theories. Findings indicate that EMS communication is best understood through assemblage theory. Using grounded theory and ethnographic research methods, this study illustrates that EMS communication involves a non-linear, network-based communication system. In this system, multiple nodes interact through spoken and written communication and autonomic, physiological activity centering on the patient. Findings also suggest that EMS communicators best learn communication skills through legitimate peripheral participation. This dissertation extends current understandings of network, activity theory, genre, and legitimate peripheral participation by arguing that assemblage theory provides a more dynamic, productive way to understand aspects of EMS communication and activity. Moreover, this dissertation suggests that instructors create opportunities for students to engage in legitimate peripheral participation while learning to communicate in the medical workplace. For EMS and medical communication researchers and practitioners, this study suggests they do the following: 1. become a member of the medical community under study if possible; 2. collaborate with medical practitioners to produce research and implement changes based on findings; and 3. use assemblage theory when studying and implementing medical communication strategies. To assist with these suggestions, this dissertation concludes with guiding questions based on findings and future research directions that may aid those working with medical communicators. Keywords: emergency medical services, medical rhetoric, professional and technical writing, technical communication, medical communication, network theory, assemblage theory, activity theory, genre theory, rhizome theory, actor-network theory, legitimate peripheral participation, memory, electronic health records, electronic medical records.