David Richard Dedo

Profile of the ESL freshman writer: Predicting success in the academic setting

David Richard Dedo

  • School: Purdue University (0183)
  • Degree: Ph.D.
  • Date: 1990; pp: 202
  • Advisor: Berns, Margie S.
  • Source: DAI-A 52/03, p. 889, Sep 1991
  • Subjects: Education, Tests And Measurements (0288); Education, Language And Literature (0279)
  • ProQuest Document Number:
  • ISBN:
  • UMI Number: AAT 9116375

Abstract:

    • This study investigates the role of several factors in the prediction of ESL Freshman Composition course grades and overall grade point average: direct measures of writing proficiency, indirect measures of English language proficiency, measures of writing apprehension for the native language and English, and education and writing background variables gathered through the Background/Writing Profile, a survey instrument developed by the ESL Program at Purdue University. Data was collected over a period of four academic semesters on 226 students enrolled in English 101I, Freshman Composition for non-native speakers.
    • Results of regression analyses show that four variables appear as significant predictors of the composition course grade for the total population: a direct measure of writing proficiency, an indirect measure of English language proficiency, the level of English instruction attained in this country, and gender. In addition, the same variables, except for gender, appear as significant predictors of overall grade point average for the total population.
    • This study also examines differences among sub-groups (European, Asian, Puerto Rican, high and low writing apprehension, and others). These analyses indicate that, while direct measures of writing proficiency consistently appear as significant predictors of both writing course grade and grade point average, different sets of variables function as optimal predictors for the various subpopulations.
    • This study suggests that further research should investigate the ESL Composition classroom in order to complement direct measures of writing proficiency with other variables that can assess the skills that are required for success in the classroom context. In addition, further investigation into prediction concerning various ESL subpopulations is suggested.